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Explore Amsterdam's Eastern Canal Belt - Amsterdam Walking Tour

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8 of 10

Seventh Leg: Back to Reguliersgracht
Corner of Reguliersgracht and Keizersgracht; 'the sun and the moon' at Reguliersgracht 11 and 13

Corner of Reguliersgracht and Keizersgracht; 'the sun and the moon' at Reguliersgracht 11 and 13

Top: © Seven Bridges Hotel; Bottom: © 2008 Shannon McAllister, licensed to About.com
Directions
Walk along the Keizersgracht back to the serene Reguliersgracht. Cross another one of its arched bridges to the far (odd) side. The house on the northeast corner (39, pictured on top in the above photo) dates to 1690 and is one of the most photographed bell gables in Amsterdam.

Wander down the odd side of Reguliersgracht; notice the buildings with the huge red shutters at at 11 and 13 (pictured on bottom in the above photo). Painted words and the original gablestone give a nod to the 17th-century warehouse's original name De Zon en De Maan ("the sun and the moon"). Today the space is home to the Hooghoudt tasting room and café, where guests can enjoy typical Dutch food and Dutch jenever (a gin-like liqueur) from the Hooghoudt Distillery.

Reguliersgracht
  • Reguliersgracht means "regulator's canal."

  • The canal gets its name from the Reguliersklooster, a convent that stood nearby from 1394 to 1532. Both of these names come from the Regulierspoort, one of the gates of medieval, walled Amsterdam, just west of Rembrandtplein (where the Munttoren now stands).

  • The city dug this canal in 1664, as Amsterdam expanded to accommodate its exploding population.

  • The canal is famous for its seven humpbacked bridges, which give the Seven Bridges Hotel and the Seven Bridges Jazz Festival their names.

  • Amsterdam city planners began filling in canals in the late 19th century to accommodate increasing horse-and-carriage traffic. Fierce community protest saved the Reguliersgracht and its beloved bridges from this fate in 1901.

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